Categories
Science

THE SCIENCE BEHIND TEMPLE BELLS.

Why  to  be  Ringed?

Most of  the old Temples  have  large  bell at  the entrance  of  the Temple &  we need  to ring it  before  we  enter Temple.

image

B’Coz  it  has  a scientific Phenomena:

It  is  made  of  various metals including  Cadmium, Lead, Copper, Zinc, Nickel, Chromium & Manganese.The proportion at which  each one of them mixed  is real science behind a  bell.

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Science

Happy Birthday, WWW! Here are 25 things the Internet made obsolete.

The World Wide Web as we know it turns 25 today and has pervaded, infiltrated and dominated billions of lives around the world since then.With the advent of the ‘digital citizen’ and the ‘netizen’ since then, the Web has effectively replaced many services and things that were integral parts of day to day life not all that long ago. When for instance, was the last time you actually took the trouble of sticking photographs in an album? Or used a physical encyclopaedia? Or sent a greeting card? With that in mind, we decided to compile a list of 25 things that are either completely or well on their way to becoming obsolete in honour of the Web’s 25th birthday.

Internet WWW
Internet WWW

1. Appointment diaries, planners and the rolodex
Pencil this one down as ‘obsolete’.Seriously, who uses planners in the age of Google and other online calendars? With all sorts of handy features like pop-up reminders, alarms, notifications and even shared calendars to make sure that you don’t miss your important appointments, the days of assiduously writing down your important meetings are well and truly over.

2. Maps
When was the last time you actually unfolded a road map to get directions? Unless you’re a true physical map romantic, chances are that you don’t remember. With services like Google Maps not only showing you roads but also calculating the best routes for you to take, there is really little reason for you to use anything else.And with online maps getting smarter and smarter and expanding their services to also show you things like traffic movement and interesting places to visit, this battle is all but over.

3. Encyclopedias
One word. Wikipedia. Enough said. And for the times that Wikipedia just doesn’t cut it, there’s always Google. More likely to be found in a museum.

4. Smut (porn) magazines
Really. Who pays for their porn anymore? The online porn industry has single handedly engineered the misfortune of many ‘established’ smut magazines. What turns off porn stars more than anything else? Free sites, that’s what.

5. Privacy
We may fight it as hard as we can, but the truth is that the Internet has long killed privacy. Unless you have absolutely no presence on social media, no one knows what you do and you have a job that won’t show up anywhere online (i.e. spy) chances are that even a cursory search of your name will reveal at least your basic information to the outside world.And then of course there is the fact that sites like Facebook and Google probably know everything about you, based on your browsing history. They claim to use this information to decide what ads to show you, but the truth is that they probably know you better than you may know yourself.

Creeped out yet? Good, because you should be.

6. Telegrams
Remember all those ‘last’ telegrams that were sent out in nostalgia last year? Yeah, blame email for that. Which brings us to point 7 which is….

7. Letters
Ah the old physical letters! Initially, the handwritten ones and then typed letters. The romanticized bundles of letters tied up with a blue ribbon in the metaphorical attic are destined to be replaced with printouts of emails.

8. Reference libraries
With online references, online book stores and so many academic articles available online for a fee, there is really no reason to trudge to a reference library, painstakingly leaf through musty volumes of books, and then carefully photocopy the sections you need. A net connection, credit card and a printer is really all you need.

9. Train timetables and almanacs
With schedules of trains and expected arrival times all available online, no one really buys timetables, but for the nostalgic value.

10. Attention spans
Have you even read this far? Well done. But seriously the Internet with all its bite-sized chunks of news and snippets, short videos and little pictures, our collective attention spans are getting shorter and… oh look! It’s a picture of a cat! Sorry, where were we?

Apologies for the distraction. Please scroll back up to read again

11. Airline booking centres
The sheer number of printouts and mobile phones with PNRs that are waved around at airports is enough explanation for this one. Booking tickets has become worlds easier now.

12. Dictionaries
With online dictionaries, it’s become much easier to type and search for words rather than painstakingly look them up in the physical dictionary. And as we all know, dictionary.com is the new tool of Scrabble lovers everywhere.

13. Photo albums
If it’s not on Facebook, it probably didn’t happen. (But watch out for those privacy settings)

14. Recipe books
Julie and Julia notwithstanding, the truth is that unless you’re a huge fan of a particular cook, you’re going to search for all your recipes online. It’s become that easy.

15. Greeting cards
The traditional greeting cards have been dealt a double whammy. First up, there were the e-card sites like Hallmark and 123greetings and now there is social media. Wishing people on Facebook is the new greeting card, people. You know it’s true.

16. Book stores
Amazon. Flipkart. Need we say more? Except for when you want a worn-out early edition, but then you can probably find it on eBay.

17 . Copyright
While we don’t advocate piracy, the fact is that we can’t ignore the effect of the Internet on copyrighted material like songs, movies and even books. Although industries and artists have been trying to fight back along with newly strengthened laws and monitoring, the fact is that it’s not that easy to do.But the effect of the Internet on copyright has not been all bad. There are theCopyleft and Creative Commons movements that have sought to share content fairly, instead of restricting them under copyright laws.

Internet plays matchmaker too

18. Personal diaries
These were first replaced by the blogs. But now we have Twitter and Facebook. Yup. Personal diaries in 140 characters in less. As for private diaries… please refer point 5.

19. Yellow pages
Want a number or address? Google it.

20. Matrimonial ads
While these are still completely not dead, as newspaper pages will prove, fact is that more and more people are turning to online matrimonial services to find the ‘perfect partner’ for themselves or their offspring. And there’s so much more choice and scope for stalking thanks to Facebook and Google. Again, refer point 5.

21. Fax
Remember the expression, “Did you get the fax I sent?”. Us neither.

22. What’s a blind date?
Though you may not ‘personally’ know someone before you meet them, chances are that with Google, Facebook and a little help from your friends, will help you find out what Mr or Ms Stranger looks like, where they work, where they went to school and what they like to eat and what they did last Saturday. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. You can find out pretty much anything you want about a person online. The only challenge will be how not to freak them out by revealing everything you know about them… on your first date.

Not the best way to begin a blind date

23. Detectives
Google, Linkedin and the other social networks are really making a lot of services redundant. Private investigators can be added to the list.

24. Bill payment centres
No more standing in lines to pay your electricity and water bills, thanks to the fact that most utility service providers have their own payment gateways.

25. Experts
Everyone is an expert thanks to Google and Wikipedia — ON the surface anyway. But given the fact that attention spans are already obsolete, who needs in-depth knowledge anyway?

Categories
Misc Science

How the Flexible Straw Was Invented

The drinking straw was invented by 3000 B.C., as attested by Sumerian artifacts. Until very recently, these straws were tubes from plant stems, such as rye. Besides dissolving in water, these straws often added unwelcome plant flavors to drinks. In 1888, Marvin Chester Stone patented a waxed paper straw that didn’t add a grassy flavor to drinks, and these quickly replaced plant straws. But we would have to wait a few more decades before straws became flexible.

Flexible Straw Was Invented
Flexible Straw Was Invented

Sometime during the 1930s, tinkerer Joseph B. Friedman watched his young daughter struggle to drink a milkshake from a high counter at a soda shop. There had to be a way to improve the design to make it flexible.

Here’s what he did:
Friedman inserted a screw into the straw toward the top (see image). Then he wrapped dental floss around the paper, tracing grooves made by the inserted screw. Finally, he removed the screw, leaving a accordion-like ridge in the middle of the once-straight straw. Voila! he had created a straw that could bend around its grooves to reach a child’s face over the edge of a glass.

The modern bendy straw was born. The plastic would come later. The “crazy” straw — you know, the one that lets you watch the liquid ride a small roller coaster in plastic before reaching your mouth — would come later, too. But the the game-changing invention had been made. In 1939, Friedman founded Flex-Straw Company. By the 1940s, he was manufacturing flex-straws with his own custom-built machines. His first sale didn’t go to a restaurant, but rather to a hospital, where glass tubes still ruled. Nurses realized that bendy straws could help bed-ridden patients drink while lying down.

Categories
Science

Proposed space shuttle missions that might have happened.

A look at some of the gutsier and goofier proposed space shuttle missions that might have happened.


Proposed space shuttle missions that might have happened.
Proposed space shuttle missions that might have happened.

 

The U.S. space shuttle fleet is set for retirement following the launch of Atlantis, scheduled for mid-July. In all, the fleet will have flown 135 missions, the first in 1981, but there were many more on the drawing board. With scrubbed missions that included daring rescues, in-orbit satellite snatches, and dangerous explosives, you can see why some of these didn’t make the cut. But just imagine if they had.

 

1979 REBOOST SKYLAB

As America’s first space station (1973–4) slipped steadily from orbit, NASA built a small booster rocket to be attached to it by a two-man crew (Fred Haise and Jack Lousma) on an urgent early flight. But launch schedules slipped, and Skylab fell on Australia.

1980 SATELLITE SNATCH

A key scenario among the planned missions that drove the shuttle’s design was the Pentagon’s need for a superfast, single-orbit mission that would deploy or retrieve a military satellite. Strictly speaking, the retrieved satellite need not have been the property of the United States. The shuttle was built to enable this, but the idea was soon abandoned.

1981 RETURN TO LAUNCH SITE

In the event of engine problems during launch, one emergency procedure involved flipping over in midascent and thrusting back to Florida for a runway landing. It worked in the simulator, but it was so dangerous that astronauts considered it barely preferable to crashing into the ocean.

1983 SALYUT RESCUE

Following a series of breakdowns on the Soviet Salyut 7 space station, NASA wondered if its upcoming mission, carrying the Spacelab module, could be diverted to perform an emergency rendezvous so that the cosmonauts could be evacuated via space walks. The answer was yes, but Moscow never asked for help.

1986 HYDROGEN BOMB

For fast planetary probes, a Centaur rocket stage was modified to be carried on the shuttle, and two launches were planned in one week in May 1986. The explosion hazard from leaking gas later led to theircancellation, but only after Challenger was lost in January.

1980s CRUISING HOME

NASA discovered that if there had been an emergency landing at an overseas airfield, the shuttle would have been too heavy for the 747 carrier aircraft to transport it across an ocean. So the agency developed a kludge plan to lift the shuttle onto the deck of an aircraft carrier, thereby limiting emergency landings to coastal airfields.

1986 CALIFORNIA (SPACE) DREAMING

The U.S. military had planned polar-orbit spy-satellite launches from California. A launchpad at Vandenberg Air Force Base was ready, spy satellite payloads had been picked, an emergency landing site on Easter Island built, and a crew trained. But the needed upgrades to engines were deemed too risky after Challenger was lost, so the mission was canceled and the pad mothballed.

LATE 1980s DARTH VADER, ASTRONAUT

During research for a space-based ballistic-missile shield (the Strategic Defense Initiative, popularly known as “Star Wars”), the Pentagon wanted to test astronauts’ ability to track objects and aim weapons in space, and Moscow accused NASA of doing so. But in truth, the test was canceled.

1990s HANDS-OFF LANDING

The shuttle’s digital autopilot has an “autoland” option, although it does require one throw of a manual switch to lower the landing gear. NASA actually scheduled a mission to test the system all the way to “wheels stop,” but the agency lost its nerve before launch and left the astronaut in control for the landing.

1998 ALL-WOMAN

A combination of astronaut selection, mission training, and flight assignments offered the option to juggle the crew manifest and put seven experienced female astronauts onto an otherwise routine shuttle mission. The selection was meant to demonstrate the level of responsibility women had earned in space, but concerns about exploitation for electoral politicking scuttled the suggestion.

2003 RESCUE COLUMBIA

Although Columb ia had been mortally wounded by launch damage and was too crippled to safely return, controllers failed to realize it in time to mount a rescue flight by the next-in-line shuttle. After the disaster, analysts examined whether that flight might have been launched in time. The answer: maybe.

2000s SUICIDE SPACE DIVE

NASA figured that if a shuttle was too damaged to safely land, the crew could hang out at the International Space Station until the next shuttle could retrieve them. The agency also developed a system to remotely pilot a crippled shuttle into the South Pacific.

 

But just imagine if they had.


IEEE Spectrum
Categories
Science

Know your Drink – Single Malt, Blended Whisky, Cognac

What is Blended Whisky?

Blended whisky is a mixture of single malt whiskys and ethanol derived from grains. Developed for those who could not stommach the strong taste of whisky, it is a combination of malt and grain whiskys. First distilled and bottled by Andrew Usher in Edinburgh in the early 1860s, it turned out to be softer, lighter and more palatable.

The character of the whisky is determined not only by the proportions of malt and grain whisky, but also by the ages of the individual whiskies and the manner in which they are combined to bring out the finest qualities in each other. Most whisky drunk across the world is blended whisky. Famous Grouse, Bells, Teacher’s, Whyte & Mackay and Johnnie
Walker are a few that are well-known.

Blended Whisky

What goes better with Whisky – Water or Soda?

Whisky is preferred with water more than soda as soda is carbonated water andit kills the taste of whisky. But real connnoisseurs of whisky like to have it neat or with water on side or with two cubes of ice.

What is Cognac?

The wines of Poitou, La Rochelle and Angoumois, produced from high qualityvineyards, were shipped to Northern Europe where they were enjoyed bythe English, Dutch and Scandinavians as early as the 13th century. Inthe 16th century, they were transformed into eau-de-vie, then matured in oak casks to become Cognac.. That was the start of the
adventure for a town, which was to become the capital of a world famous trade. Cognac is a living thing. During its time in the oak casks it is in permanent contact with the air. This allows it to extract the substances from thewood that give both its colour and its final bouquet.

Ageing is indispensable if an eau-de-vie is to become Cognac. It takes placein casks or barrels that hold between 270 and 450 litres. The natural humidity of the cellars, in which the casks are stored, with its influence on evaporation, is one of the determining factors in the maturing process. With the balance between humidity and dryness, the spirit becomes mellow and ages harmoniously.

Making Cognac is the work of the Master Blender. Applying strict control, experience and intuition, he subtly blends eaux-de-vie of different ages and crus, producing a Cognac that through the years will not only retain its own personality, but will also keep a place in the heart of the consumer.

Hefe-Weizen – a wheat beer, lighter in body, flavour and alcohol strength.

Ice Beer – a high-alcohol beer made by cooling the beer during the process to below the freezing point of water (32 degrees Fahrenheit) but above that of alcohol (-173 degrees Fahrenheit). . When the formed ice is removed and discarded, the beer ends up with a higher alcohol-to-water ratio.

India Pale Ale (IPA) – a generously hopped pale ale.

Kolsch – West German ale, very pale (brassy gold) in hue, with a mild malt flavour and some lactic tartness.

Malt Liquor – Most malt liquors are lagers that are too alcoholic to be labelled lagers or beers.

Ale – Made of the highest quality malts, the driest and most highly hopped beer. Sold as light ale or pale ale in bottle or on draft as bitter.

Pilsner – Delicately dry and aromatic beers.

Porter – A darker (medium to dark reddish brown) ale style beer, full-bodied, a bit on the bitter side. The barley

(or barley-malt) is well roasted, giving the brew a characteristic chocolaty, bittersweet flavour.

Stout beer – Brewed from roasted, full-flavored malts, often with an addition of caramel sugar and a slightly higher proportion of hops. Stouts have a richer, slightly burnt flavour and are dark in colour.

Wheat Beer – A beer in which wheat malt is substituted for barley malt. Usually medium-bodied, with a bit of tartness on the palate


Enjoy.. now you know what you are drinking…


Categories
Misc Science

Male-Female Brain Differences

Male-Female Brain Differences
Male-Female Brain Differences

What kind of brain do you have? There really are big differences between the male and female brain, says Simon Baron-Cohen, director of the Autism Research Center, Cambridge University. In his new book, the Essential Difference: Men, Women and the Extreme Male Brain (published by Penguin) Baron-Cohen shows that, indisputably, on average male and female minds are of a slightly different character. Men tend to be better at analyzing systems (better systemisers), while women tend to be better at reading the emotions of other people (better empathisers). Baron-Cohen shows that this distinction arises from biology, not culture.

Cell numbers: men have 4% more brain cells than women, and about 100 grams more of brain tissue. Many women have asked me why men need more brain tissue in order to get the same things done.

Cellular connections: even though a man seems to have more brain cells, it is reported that women have more dendritic connections between brain cells.

Corpus collosum size: it is reported that a woman’s brain has a larger corpus collusum, which means women can transfer data between the right and left hemisphere faster than men. Men tend to be more left brained, while women have greater access to both sides.

Language: for men, language is most often just in the dominant hemisphere (usually the left side), but a larger number of women seem to be able to use both sides for language. This gives them a distinct advantage. If a woman has a stroke in the left front side of the brain, she may still retain some language from the right front side. Men who have the same left sided damage are less likely to recover as fully.

Limbic size: bonding/nesting instincts – current research has demonstrated that females, on average, have a larger deep limbic system than males. This gives females several advantages and disadvantages. Due to the larger deep limbic brain women are more in touch with their feelings, they are generally better able to express their feelings than men. They have an increased ability to bond and be connected to others (which is why women are the primary caretakers for children – there is no society on earth where men are primary caretakers for children). Females have a more acute sense of smell, which is likely to have developed from an evolutionary need for the mother to recognize her young. Having a larger deep limbic system leaves a female somewhat more susceptible to depression, especially at times of significant hormonal changes such as the onset of puberty, before menses, after the birth of a child and at menopause. Women attempt suicide three times more than men. Yet, men kill themselves three times more than women, in part, because they use more violent means of killing themselves (women tend to use overdoses with pills while men tend to either shoot or hang themselves) and men are generally less connected to others than are women. Disconnection from others increases the risk of completed suicides.

Categories
Misc Science

Why Does My Body Do That?

Learn the common causes behind your body’s little quirks

Whether uncomfortable, embarrassing or just plain weird, there are some pretty funky things that our bodies do. Curious about the causes of such reactions as hiccups, goose bumps and eye twitches….

Read on to discover the common reasons for peculiar bodily functions.

Yawns

Yawns
Yawns

If your body is low on oxygen, your mouth opens wide and tries to suck more in. Yawning is a way to regulate the amount of carbon dioxide and oxygen in your blood. Unfortunately, yawns are nearly impossible to stifle.


Eye Twitches

Eye Twitches
Eye Twitches

Serious eye twitches can be a symptom of neurological disorders, but often there is a more mundane explanation. Common causes for eye twitches include stress, lack of sleep, extended staring or eye strain. Before you get frantic, try reducing your stress level, cutting back on caffeine and catching up on sleep.


Itches

Itches
Itches

According to Dr. Plasker, our skin most often gets itchy because of dryness associated with the environment or over-washing—water and soap can strip skin of its natural oils, thus sapping moisture. Face or body lotion should be able to keep these types of itches under control; also look for body washes and soaps labeled “moisturizing.” If you still have itchy patches, you may be experiencing an allergic reaction to a chemical, plant, food, animal or drug. See an allergist if the itching is persistent.


Hiccups

Hiccups
Hiccups

If you’ve frequently got a case of the hiccups, try slowing down when you eat and drink, suggests Dr. Plasker. Doing either too quickly causes your stomach to swell; this irritates your diaphragm, which contracts and causes hiccups. You may also get hiccups in emotional situations or if your body experiences a sudden temperature change. In both of these cases, the hiccups are a result of a glitch in your nerve pathways, which is why a sudden scare—which might shake up and reset your nerves—can sometimes end an episode.


Goose Bumps

Goose Bumps
Goose Bumps

Those tiny bumps that cover your skin when you’re cold or scared are actually a defense mechanism. Goose bumps occur when the arrector pili, a tiny muscle that connects the hair follicle with skin, contracts and makes the hair stand on end. If you had more hair—like cavemen did—the upright hair would trap air to keep you warm or make you look bushier and therefore more threatening to predators.


Sneezes

Sneezes
Sneezes

Sneezes happen when your body is trying to expel an irritant from the nasal cavity. If you have allergies, pollen or pet dander is usually to blame. If you have a cold, your body makes mucus to trap the virus, and sneezing helps force it (and the sickness) out of your body. An over-the-counter allergy or cold medicine helps suppress your reaction to allergens or reduce mucus production, which should prevent sneezing fits.


Coughs

Coughs
Coughs

A cough is another mechanism your body uses to get rid of irritants. There are special cells along your air passage, says Dr. Plasker, that recognize irritants and force them out. Common colds, sinus infections and pneumonia all increase your body’s mucus production, which triggers coughing. Smoking and asthma also tend to irritate the cells. To help cut down on chronic coughing, exercise regularly and practice good posture to keep your air passage open.


Charley Horses

Charley-Horses
Charley-Horses

These sudden, super-painful muscle spasms can be blamed on several things, including dehydration or electrolyte imbalances—often from strenuous exercise. After a demanding workout or an extra-long run, sip a sports drink to keep your system running smoothly. If you experience this type of cramping, walk around to help relieve the pain.


Shivers

Shivers
Shivers

Shivering, says Dr. Plasker, is full-body muscle twitching. When your temperature drops too low, your body shakes all over in an attempt to generate heat. The only way to cure these kind of shivers is to get your temperature back to 98.6°F.


Ear Ringing

Ears Ringing
Ears Ringing

Ear ringing, or tinnitus, can happen for two reasons. If you have fluid or an infection in your middle ear, you may hear a constant buzz. However, the more common cause is damage to the microscopic ends of your hearing nerves, which often happens when you’re exposed to loud noises. To prevent permanent damage (and preserve your hearing), wear earplugs at concerts and sporting events—or even when you mow the lawn.


Stomach Rumbles

Stomach Rumbles
Stomach Rumbles

As food, liquid and gas move through your digestive tract, your stomach muscles and intestines contract and cause rumbling noises—borborygmi is the scientific name. Everyone’s stomach makes noise during digestion, but if you have extra-loud rumbles, a teaspoon of olive oil or a cup of herbal tea with lemon may help ease them, says Dr. Plasker.


Limbs Falling Asleep

Limbs Falling Asleep
Limbs Falling Asleep

When there’s consistent pressure on part of a limb—like when you sit on your feet or rest your head on an arm—the pressure squeezes your nerve pathways and scrambles messages sent to your brain. The mixed messages make you lose feeling in the squished body part because your brain has trouble telling it what to do. To prevent a case of pins and needles, avoid sitting or lying in positions that compress your nerves.


Seeing Stars

Seeing Stars
Seeing Stars

If you stand too quickly, suffer a blow to the head or are stricken by a migraine, there’s a good chance you’ll see stars as blood surges to different parts of your body. Generally these tiny flashes of light will fade in a few seconds. If you see stars for more than a few moments, you could have a tear or tiny clot in your retina, and you should consult a physician immediately.


Ear Popping

Ear Popping
Ear Popping

The Eustachian tube in your inner ear is responsible for maintaining equal pressure on both sides of your eardrum. When you experience a rapid change in altitude—during takeoff in an airplane or when riding an elevator in an extra-tall building—the Eustachian tube opens to release pressure, and you hear a pop. To force the tube open (and “pop” your ears),  Squeeze your nostrils closed while exhaling forcefully through your nose.

Categories
Misc Science

Certain aromas can help lift your mood and energise you

Certain aromas can help lift your mood and energize you.

Aroma can change mood.
Certain aromas can help lift your mood and energize you.

Studies suggest that our sense of smell is 10,000 times more precise than our sense of taste. In fact when a scent is detected, it sends a signal to a part of the brain that controls memories and emotions. This is why the smell of popcorn reminds you of the movies or a whiff of coffee brings memories of early mornings. A scent can also help lower stress levels, improve mental and physical health, ease pain and curb insomnia.

Increase your sex drive : It may sound bizarre but studies suggest that baby powder, cucumber and even licorice, can turn women on. Pink grapefruit, oranges, etc, can help. Fresh citrus fragrances remind you of spring and summer and help you be perceived as younger and more energetic.

Control cravings: If you are one of those who suffer from major snack binges, then you should be sniffing green apple, banana or your favourite scent. Studies suggest that this will help you give up your cravings and lose weight in the long run. The brain is fooled into believing that you have already eaten the foods and will make you feel full longer. You can also try using cinnamon and vanilla scents.

Calm yourself : Lavender oil has been used since years to relax and calm the mind. Try adding a few drops of orange or lavender to a diffuser and use in your office or home on very stressful days. Bathing with a lavender-scented wash is another great way to unwind after a long day at work. Historically, it is considered calming, cooling, immune-enhancing and hormone-balancing. Lavender oil can also be used to calm emotions like fear, doubt and worry, as well as feelings of anger and irritability.

Learn something new : If you have been working really hard on a big presentation or staying up all night studying for your exams, try using rosemary oil. It is said to have properties that will help make you more alert and attentive. Rosemary essential oil is known to be a good brain and nerve tonic. It improves mental activity and is a solution for depression, mental fatigue and forgetfulness. Inhaling some rosemary oil will improve your spirit immediately and eliminate boredom.

Reduce pain: Put aside all those pills and go for something natural. Lavender or peppermint oil can ease headaches and other pains. It is said that the presence of calcium antagonism in peppermint oil aids in removing pain. It is also cooling in nature and helps ease fever. Put a few drops on a handkerchief and inhale the aroma.

Courtesy //timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/5527429.cms?prtpage=1

Categories
Science

Needle Can Save The Life Of A Stroke Patient.

THE LIFE OF A STROKE PATIENT
THE LIFE OF A STROKE PATIENT

From a Chinese Professor.

Keep a syringe or needle in your home to do this… It’s amazing and an unconventional way of recovering from stroke, read it through it can help somebody one day.

This is amazing. Please keep this very handy. Excellent tips.

Do take a minute to read this. You’ll never know, ones life may depend on you.

My father was paralysed and later died from the result of a stroke. I wish I knew about this first aid before.
When stroke strikes, the capillaries in the brain will gradually burst. (Irene Liu)

When a stroke occurs, stay calm.

No matter where the victim is, do not move him/her. Because, if moved, the capillaries will burst.

Help the victim to sit up where he/she is to prevent him/her from falling over again and then the blood letting can begin .

If you have in your home an injection syringe that would be the best.

Otherwise, a sewing needle or a straight pin will do.

1. Place the needle/pin over fire to sterilize it and then use it to prick the tip of all ……10 fingers.

2. There are no specific acupuncture points, just prick about an mm from the fingernail.

3. Prick till blood comes out.

4. If blood does not start to drip, then squeeze with your fingers.

5. When all 10 digits is bleeding, wait a few minutes then the victim will regain consciousness.

6. If the victim’s mouth is crooked , then pull on his ears until they are red.

7. Then prick each earlobe twice until two drops of blood comes from each earlobe.

After a few minutes the victim should regain consciousness.

Wait till the victim regains his normal state without any abnormal symptoms then take him to the hospital.

Otherwise, if he was taken in the ambulance in a hurry to the hospital, the bumpy trip will cause all the capillaries in his brain to burst.

If he could save his life, barely managing to walk, then it is by the grace of his ancestors.

‘I learned about letting blood to save life from Chinese traditional doctor, Ha Bu Ting, who lives in Sun Juke.

Furthermore, I had practical experience with it. Therefore, I can say this method is 100% effective.

In 1979, I was teaching in Fung Gaap College in Tai Chung.

One afternoon, I was teaching a class when another teacher came running to my classroom and said in panting,

‘Ms Liu, come quick, our supervisor has had a stroke !’. I immediately went to the 3rd floor.

When I saw our supervisor, Mr. Chen Fu Tien, his colour was off, his speech was slurred , his mouth was crooked – all the symptoms of a stroke.

I immediately asked one of the practicum students to go to the pharmacy outside the school to buy a syringe, which I used to prick Mr. Chen’s 10 fingers tips.

When all 10 fingers were bleeding (each with a pea-sized drop of blood), after a few minutes, Mr. Chen’s face regained its colour and his eyes’ spirit returned,

But his mouth was still crooked . So I pulled on his ears to fill them with blood .

When his ears became red ,

I pricked his right earlobe twice to let out two drops of blood .

When both earlobes had two drops of blood each , a miracle happened .

Within 3-5 minutes the shape of his mouth returned to normal and his speech became clear.

We let him rest for a while and have a cup of hot tea , then we helped him go down the stairs, drove him to Wei Wah Hospital . He rested one night and was released the next day to return to school to teach.. Everything worked normally.

There were no ill after effects.

On the other hand, the usual stroke victim usually suffers Irreparable bursting of the brain capillaries on the way to the hospital. As a result, these victims never recover.’ (Irene Liu)Therefore, stroke is the second cause of death. The lucky ones will stay alive but can remain paralysed for life.

It is such a horrible thing to happen in ones life.

If we can all remember this blood letting method and start the life saving process immediately, in a short time, the victim will be revived and regain 100% normality.

Categories
Science

Swine influenza-Transmission-Signs and symptoms-Prevention-Treatment

Swine influenza (also called swine flu, hog flu, and pig flu) is an infection by any one of several types of swine influenza virus. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is any strain of the influenza family of viruses that is endemic in pigs. As of 2009, the known SIV strains include influenza C and the subtypes of influenza A known as H1N1, H1N2, H3N1, H3N2, and H2N3.

Swine influenza virus
Swine influenza virus

Swine influenza virus is common throughout pig populations worldwide. Transmission of the virus from pigs to humans is not common and does not always lead to human influenza, often resulting only in the production of antibodies in the blood. If transmission does cause human influenza, it is called zoonotic swine flu. People with regular exposure to pigs are at increased risk of swine flu infection. The meat of an infected animal poses no risk of infection when properly cooked.

During the mid-20th century, identification of influenza subtypes became possible, allowing accurate diagnosis of transmission to humans. Since then, only 50 such transmissions have been confirmed. These strains of swine flu rarely pass from human to human. Symptoms of zoonotic swine flu in humans are similar to those of influenza and of influenza-like illness in general, namely chills, fever, sore throat, muscle pains, severe headache, coughing, weakness and general discomfort.